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Monday, February 18, 2008

Overlooked Unitarian U.S. presidents in the media.

Ah, poor Millard Fillmore! Of the five Unitarians who were elected president of the United States, Fillmore has the least remarkable reputation. But today is his day: He's now the butt of a Presidents Day TV advertisement from Kia. The ad campaign features (we are not making this up) a Millard Fillmore soap-on-a-rope.

The ad apparently didn't go over well at Kia: Two executives left the company when the off-beat humor of the ad didn't amuse the company's CEO.

Copyright © 2008 by Philocrites | Posted 18 February 2008 at 8:44 PM

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5 comments:

Jeff W.:

February 18, 2008 09:40 PM | Permalink for this comment

I too thought "Ah, Millard Fillmore, he was a Unitarian" when I saw the ad. Can't say he comes off too well in it.

So two executives had to seek other employment whent he ad didn't please the boss? I think we may see the beginnings of a new urban legend: The Curse of Fillmore!

Dubhlainn:

February 19, 2008 02:42 AM | Permalink for this comment

DUDE! I so want one of those Millard Fillmore soap-on-a-rope. I wish they were real!

The weirdest part of that comment is that I only like 30 percent joking.

Philocrites:

February 19, 2008 07:25 AM | Permalink for this comment

Dubhlainn, I'm not at all joking when I say I want a Fillmore soap-on-a-rope — although a William Howard Taft soap-on-a-rope would last longer! ;)

Deb:

February 19, 2008 11:27 AM | Permalink for this comment

So, who are the UU Five?

Philocrites:

February 19, 2008 11:47 AM | Permalink for this comment

John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Millard Fillmore, and William Howard Taft were all members of Unitarian churches. (Taft served as the president of the National Conference of Unitarian Churches — the forerunner of today's General Assembly — between his presidency and his appointment to the Supreme Court.)

Thomas Jefferson is often listed as a Unitarian because he (later) identified his own religious outlook as Unitarian, but many people contest the degree to which he should be called a Unitarian.



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