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Sunday, November 25, 2007

Doug Muder's interpretive key to Episcopal schism.

A few Episcopal bloggers are reading Doug Muder's UU World cover story about class and liberal religion to make sense out of the growing divide between socially and theologically conservative Episcopalians and the more moderate and theologically liberal Episcopalians who now dominate the U.S. church. Check out "Classism and the Maze of Schism" by Elizabeth Kaeton at Telling Secrets and "Still More Questions" by Allen Mellen at Morningsider.

Be sure also to see the letters to the editor about Muder's essay in the Winter issue of UU World, which also highlights some of the blog feedback his essay provoked.

Copyright © 2007 by Philocrites | Posted 25 November 2007 at 2:58 PM

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1 comments:

Rev Elz:

November 28, 2007 10:28 AM | Permalink for this comment

In the case of the Episcopalians, the African connection is important. African social structure is based on the alpha male tribal leader, and strongly enforced, often through violence. When I was growing up, in a family of international affairs professionals, "tribalism" was considered a dirty word for a bad situation, not the romantic Native American term we have here.

The fact that some North American Episcopal parishes are connecting themselves to an African bishop is thus far more than a theological statement. It is not about education -- these congregations tend to be the most educated and affluent, the ones who can afford international air fares and expenses to bring in or go to an African prelate. Their secession is making a reflected and chosen statement about patriarchal social structure that needs to be taken seriously. As with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons), these congregations are making a statement about straight families that is significant in itself, and needs to be considered way beyond its impact on GLBT rights.



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