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Monday, January 23, 2006

While your host is busy...

I'm sorry for the lull here recently, but free time has been scarce. While I'm preoccupied, why not pick up the January/February issue of The Atlantic? It took me three lunches to get all the way through the illuminating cover story about Cardinal Ratzinger's rise to the papacy, but if you want to keep up with my lunchtime reading, I'm currently digesting these essays about religion in American politics: "Why the culture war is the wrong war" by E.J. Dionne Jr. and "Tribal relations" by Steven Waldman and John C. Green. There's an especially useful graphic showing the "twelve tribes" of American religious politics with the second essay; Waldman and Green have written a briefer version of the same analysis for Beliefnet.

And yes, I know it violates the gospel of blogging to recommend articles that aren't available for free online — but I'm really suggesting that you go out and pay a few dollars to pick up a dead tree magazine. What can I say? I don't have time to keep up with the Internet these days. Be back soon.

Copyright © 2006 by Philocrites | Posted 23 January 2006 at 10:46 PM

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1 comments:

Kevin McCulloch:

January 25, 2006 09:49 AM | Permalink for this comment

The article on the popes was excellent, but your readers may find a small item on page 52 more relevant:

Most of us will admit to wasting some time at work. But three new studies suggest that more time is lost now than ever before. According to a survey by the magazine Advertising Age, a leading culprit is Weblogs. The survey indicates that one in four U.S. workers reads blogs regularly while at work, losing, on average, some nine percent of the workweek. This amounts to 551,000 years of labor lost in 2005 alone.

The worst offenders, no doubt, are those bloggers whose postings are so consistently thought-provoking and insightful that they demand attention, no matter what deadline is looming. At last, a plausible explanation for our jobless recovery, immigration crisis and unsustainable dependence on foreign oil. You have much to answer for, Philocrites.



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