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Saturday, October 29, 2005

More on tomorrow's civil rights march in Boston.

A reminder to Boston-area readers that several events this weekend — especially a Sunday afternoon march from Roxbury to Boston Common — will mark the 40th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, which finally put some teeth into the laws guaranteeing African Americans the right to vote. The march starts at the First Church in Roxbury (home of the Unitarian Universalist Urban Ministry), where the program begins at 1:00. Ignore today's chilly pseudo-snow showers; it will be sunny and pleasant in Boston tomorrow. It looks like the march will begin sometime around 2:30.

Rep. John Lewis, who participated in the 1965 Selma protests that led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act, will speak at Boston Common in the later afternoon. The rest of the line-up is a who's who of political, religious, and community leaders.

Today's Globe profiles two community leaders whose friendship has helped bridge the divide between the suburban Jewish community and the urban black community, and who have helped make this weekend's events possible. Sid Topol is an 81-year-old philanthropist and leader in the Jewish community; his brother marched in Selma. Ron Bell is a 42-year-old African-American community organizer who has been the driving force in setting up the march. They're inspiring individually, but their working friendship over the past five years is even more impressive.

("Friends on the March," Bella English, Boston Globe 10.29.05, reg req'd; "Profile: Rep. John Lewis," Religion & Ethics Newsweekly 1.16.04)

Copyright © 2005 by Philocrites | Posted 29 October 2005 at 10:42 AM

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1 comments:

Philocrites:

October 29, 2005 08:59 PM | Permalink for this comment

Okay, so Saturday's "pseudo-snow showers" turned out to be big fluffy flakes falling all afternoon. But tomorrow's forecast is still sunny and in the 60s!



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